Week 2, Monday

March 30, 2009 at 6:57 pm (Java, Week 2) (, , , , , , )

I feel like I’m getting close to completing the Tic-Tac-Toe game in Java. The functionality is there for Swing GUI and console modes, but I have a lot more to learn about GUI testing (simulating mousePressed and actionPerformed events) and testing threads (turns out I need to USE threads to test threads – duh).

But I’m feeling much more comfortable in Java. At Micah’s suggestion today, I took a lot of GUI-specific code (JLabel, JButton, etc.) out of my controller class and moved it into the view. This made a lot of sense since the implementation of the view should be easily swappable, without the controller worrying about it. I also refactored my old ConsoleDisplay class out to be more in line with my GUI code, so that both the console code and GUI code are just views, using the SAME controller/presenter. This was kind of a pain in that I had to add threading in the console code so that the GUI controller worked for it as well, but the big win here is that I can swap out views super-easily. It probably would have taken me another whole weekend without Micah’s help today, though.

We had an internal stand-up meeting, where everybody briefly talked about their current projects, side projects, learning experiences, blogs, kata, etc. It was short and to the point, but I think it’s a great idea for a team’s camaraderie – especially since two of the team members work at a client site. Paul just came out with a great blog post titled Material Consciousness in Software that’s well worth your time, and both Erics have blog posts in the works. Stay tuned!

Speaking of the culture here at 8th Light, I noticed very early on that everyone, without exception, shakes hands with everyone else as they arrive at work, and as they leave. It seemed very formal and quirky at first, but it’s really growing on me. So often, people show up to work with their team and barely grunt a “Morning” before diving into code. I definitely was guilty of that at my old job, and it seems like this is a good way to reinforce the team’s communication. Now that I write this down, it sounds like marketing mumbo-jumbo, but it’s a fact. I don’t know whether this is something that’s grown organically here or if the guys formulated the idea before its execution (or somewhere in between), but shaking hands feels like it solidifies a relationship each time, and at the same time heightens the importance of what you’re about to do (or have just done): software craftsmanship.

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