RSpec getting easier on new project

May 26, 2009 at 9:44 pm (Ruby, Week 10) (, , , )

I hopped on a new project today with Jim and Paul (both Erics are also on the project, but weren’t in the office today). It’s a Rails application, and I was making some changes and bug fixes. I ended up having lots of questions for both of the guys as I got acquainted with the application; some of those are going to go away as I learn the codebase. The end of the first iteration is tomorrow, so I’m trying to work quickly to patch up these bugs, but at the same time I’m keeping a high standard of quality. It was a little stressful, but that’s probably mostly because I had a little too much caffeine – nobody’s putting pressure on me to hurry up yet!

It was great taking responsibility for a small piece Rails code (test-driving it, of course) and improving it. As I’ve said before, I generally feel very comfortable working with Rails and HTML/CSS, so I appreciate the chance to give back to the team, even though the other guys are probably still faster on the Rails test-writing.

RSpec isn’t feeling foreign at all anymore. At this point, I think I have a decent intuition for when to mock, when to stub, and the general syntax, but my vocabulary needs much improvement. I spent some time with the RSpec documentation looking for matchers, but I didn’t always know where to look to find what I wanted (especially in view and controller tests). So I’m planning to bone up a bit on objects like response and template (looks like the RSpec wiki on GitHub is a great source of information).

Tonight Software Craftsmanship group meeting was awesome. Doug kicked things off by talking about a bit of the history behind the software craftsmanship manifesto, and his thoughts on gaining consensus and what makes someone an authority. The main takeaway, for me (in addition to the contextual history of the manifesto), was that apprenticeship is the path to finding your personal authority. When you’re an apprentice to someone, you’re making that person an authority in your field of apprenticeship.

Then Jake Scruggs and Jim talked about their experiences during the software craftsmanship swap (which they’ve also both blogged about). It was mostly a question-and-answer session, but both of the guys were really interesting and engaging speakers. I’m excited about the next swap; it seems to me that it’s energized both teams into improvement.

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